You just can’t take things too seriously … seriously

Because … why not, it’s FRIDAY!!!

 

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LeninTime
LeninTime

"As to off shore or outsourcing jobs, companies are in the business to make profits."

***
Who's the propaganda genius that has the natives reeling this stuff off ^^^ like it's the most natural thing in the world? 

Hire me that guy!

td1234
td1234

"People with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degrees or certifications are in a prime position in the economy, according to a new workforce study released this morning.

Workers with associate's degrees in STEM fields out-earn 63 percent of people who have bachelor's degrees in other fields. Almost half of workers with bachelor's degrees in STEM fields out-earn workers with Ph.D.'s in other fields, according to the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

That doesn't mean people with STEM degrees are necessarily working in those fields, says center Director Anthony Carnevale, the lead author of the report. He says technical skills have "become the common currency of the labor market," much the same way a liberal arts education was seen as a basic requirement for high-paying jobs in past years.

Occupations in STEM jobs will continue to grow—the center estimates that careers in the field will make up about 5 percent of all jobs by 2018, but demand for STEM skills in other fields has skyrocketed.

Carnevale says STEM competency has become a "foundational skill" for those looking to go into upper management. This causes a divergence in STEM talent—people with STEM degrees go into lucrative careers in finance or management, Carnevale says. For every 100 students who graduates with a bachelor's degree, 19 graduate with a degree in STEM, but only eight are working in a STEM occupation 10 years down the line, according to the report.

This isn't a problem for the workers, according to Carnevale, but it can be a problem for corporations. Workers may leave STEM occupations for higher-paying jobs, but he also says being a lab scientist doesn't "satisfy social or entrepreneurial interests" for many.

"It's not a problem. The economy wants this, it's good for the individual," he says. "But the economy wants more [STEM-qualified workers]. From the point of view of employers, they feel frustrated, but the reason they can't keep people is themselves. They keep stealing people from each other."

With job switches come salary bumps. Regardless of occupation, people with a bachelor's degree in a STEM major make roughly $500,000 more over their lifetimes than non-STEM majors. Over the past 30 years, salaries in STEM-related jobs have jumped faster than those in any other occupation other than healthcare professionals and managerial occupations. STEM wages jumped 31 percent over the past 30 years, compared with 23 percent for all non-STEM occupations.

Carnevale says this data contradicts the assertion some make that the United States has enough STEM graduates, an argument made by Richard Freeman in a 2008 report released by the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

Freeman wrote that believers in the STEM shortage favor "guest worker programs to keep a sizable flow of less-skilled but legal immigrants coming to the country."

He says that "increased supplies of skilled labor in low-wage countries will squeeze highly skilled as well as less-skilled U.S. workers," and writes that there's a problem with "attracting homegrown American talent to science and engineering in the face of increasing supplies of highly qualified students and workers from lower-wage countries."

[Learn why companies want more foreign STEM workers.]

Not so, says Carnevale. He says Freeman and others see that there are two STEM graduates for every new STEM job opening. But the migration of STEM talent to other fields means there's a shortage of workers wanting to take those jobs, and demand pushes the wages up.

"It's the best of all possible worlds. The institutions are chasing the individuals, so the individuals have the upper hand. That's what we want," he says. "It's not a crisis, it's a market, which is to say that this skill is scarce, and employers are chasing the skill. The demand for the skill is going up, the wages are going up."

The report asserts that the United States needs more middle-tier high school students to study STEM—whether they get a bachelor's degree or an associate's degree. If only the best students continue to go into STEM, there will continue to be the divergence, he says. "The rest of our economy needs more of these people," he says. "In the end, you can track this back to high school math. We're very good at the high end, but math is the place most students fail … that's the biggest challenge of them all. How do we get young people to learn math?"


http://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/stem-education/2011/10/20/stem-competency-a-foundational-skill-jobs-expert-says

_GodlessHeathen_
_GodlessHeathen_

Why don't companies just pay everyone minimum wage?  Huge profits from a reduction in labor costs.

JohnnyReb
JohnnyReb

Some people here should spend their time raising their business knowledge instead of blogging.


Unskilled labor is pretty much based on minimum wage or the lowest pay that allows obtaining workers.


However, once you go above unskilled, then education, experience, and the going wage for same in the market dictates.

td1234
td1234

@JohnnyReb

Key Findings
  • In 2013, there were 5.7 million total postings in STEM fields. Of those, 76%, or 4.4 million, require at least a bachelor’s degree, and 41%, or 2.3 million, are entry-level jobs requiring less than 2 years of experience.

  • 48% of all entry-level jobs requiring a bachelor’s degree or higher (BA+) are in STEM fields, while only 29% of bachelor’s degree graduates earn a STEM degree. At the sub-baccalaureate level (Sub-BA), 24% of entry-level jobs are in STEM fields, while 32% of Sub-BA degrees are in STEM concentrations.

  • There are 2.5 entry-level job postings for each new 4-year graduate in STEM fields compared to 1.1 postings for each new BA graduate in non-STEM fields.

  • STEM jobs offer a substantial salary premium. The average advertised salary for entry-level STEM jobs requiring a BA or higher is $66,123 compared to $52,299 for non-STEM jobs. This difference of approximately $14,000 represents a 26% premium. At the Sub-BA level, the average advertised entry-level salary is $47,856 for STEM jobs and $37,424 for non-STEM jobs. This difference of over $10,000 represents a 28% premium.

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@JohnnyReb And some people here should spend more time being human beings instead of just businessmen.


If your business puts profits first and people last, then the people shouldn't bother putting the welfare of your business very high on their list of Important Things That Deserve Defending.


If your economic engine only generates profit for you and your investors and doesn't meaningfully participate in sustaining the welfare of the Republic and the populace, then why should the Republic and the populace bother sustaining your business with their patronage?

JohnnyReb
JohnnyReb

Lenin - I see you have noting noteworthy to contribute, not even an opinion and instead attack the character of specifi other bloggers.


If you want to put yourself in my reference idiot category, go ahead.  I was trying to be kind.

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@td1234 @honested @straker @td1234 @honested @straker "Wages are paid to people based on their education, skill sets and the value they give to the company."


Negative.  Wages are paid to people based on what the market will bear and what the employer can get away with.


There is absolutely no objective assessment of education, skill sets and value that's used by any company, let alone Corporate America altogether.


td1234
td1234

@Tuna Meowt So you are saying an engineer coming into a company can be paid the same amount as a high school dropout? 

td1234
td1234

@Tuna Meowt @td1234 Yes, you post was totally out of the context of the discussion and very stupid. Basic principle: People that take the time and put in the effort to get an education and develop a marketable skill set gets paid more money. 

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@td1234 @Tuna Meowt "Yes, you post was totally out of the context of the discussion and very stupid."


If I had said what you claimed, which I demonstrably didn't.  I can't help that you're both stupid AND dishonest, TeeDee.


"Basic principle: People that take the time and put in the effort to get an education and develop a marketable skill set gets paid more money."


Which doesn't in any way conflict with what I said.


YOU erroneously claimed that wages are set according to skill sets, education and value to the company.  They're not.  They're more often based on prevailing wage and what the company *budgets* for that position and you know it as well as I do.


There is absolutely no objective means of taking a candidate's qualifications in the areas you cited and applying them to a formula to obtain an ideal wage, as you dishonestly suggested.


Work on your reading comprehension and writing skills, Champ.


Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@Visual_Cortex "In an open letter to Iran's leaders first reported by Bloomberg, a group of 47 Senators say that any agreement could be revoked by the next president if it is not approved by Congress."


Just by way of observation, that would be an unwise move by Congress, given how such things have turned out recently.


President Clinton managed to get the North Koreans to suspend their atomic research program by offering concessions involving fuel and a heavy-water reactor (all but useless for producing weaponizable fission products).  That plan worked fine until President Bush decided he didn't like it and largely trashed it, demanding a new round of talks with and concessions from the DPRK.


In the end, the North Koreans chucked the agreement (called the Agreed Framework), completed their research and tested their A-bomb.  Based on that, I recommend that Congress not be dipspits and instead, get on board  with working out an agreement that both sides can live with, but which also denies the Iranians the means to build a bomb.


honested
honested

@Tuna Meowt @Visual_Cortex 

That is expecting the amateurs in the majority to put the interest of the United States over their blind ideology.....

Good luck with that.

St Simons he-ne-ha
St Simons he-ne-ha

@Tuna Meowt - the letter going behind the executive branch's back, threatening passage of a treaty with a foreign govt - Is that treason as defined in the legal sense/world of lawyers?

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@St_Simons_he-ne-ha @Tuna Meowt That's a tough one.  Since treaties do have to be approved by Congress, one could make a case that Congress is within its rights to do so.


However, IMO, that demonstration of American fractiousness on the matter is a bad idea.  I think it communicates to the Iranians that there's plenty of room to exploit the advantage, and that time's on *their* side, not our side.


If time is as critical as Netanyahu would have us believe, then Congress ought to recognize that the open letter was a bad idea.  Even if Congress and the President are far, far apart on the issue, we gain no advantage by letting the Iranians become aware of that.


Yes_Jesus_Can
Yes_Jesus_Can

From Obama's speech in Selma:  Too many contradictions in this one paragraph to begin a short discussion here.   

With effort, we can roll back poverty and the roadblocks to opportunity. Americans don’t accept a free ride for anybody, nor do we believe in equality of outcomes. But we do expect equal opportunity. And if we really mean it, if we’re not just giving lip service to it, but if we really mean it and are willing to sacrifice for it, then, yes, we can make sure every child gets an education suitable to this new century, one that expands imaginations and lifts sights and gives those children the skills they need. We can make sure every person willing to work has the dignity of a job, and a fair wage, and a real voice, and sturdier rungs on that ladder into the middle class.

td1234
td1234

"On the 50th anniversary of the march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, The New York Times chose a front page picture of President Barack Obama, his family, and civil rights leaders who were there at the time. Missing from the photo, though only a few people down to the right, were former President George W. Bush and his wife Laura. "

LeninTime
LeninTime

@td1234

On hand "were former President George W. Bush and his wife Laura".

***
Rounding out the farce of it. Lol.

honested
honested

@td1234 

Having realized their error, most Americans would prefer that g.w. 'shrub' bush would be absent from all photos in the future.

straker
straker

Left


I'd call it the "professional victim" industry.


Lenin, if you don't see this, then open you eyes to something besides Socialism and  Communism.

LeninTime
LeninTime

@straker

What does what I support have to do with a 'professional victim industry'? 

Yes_Jesus_Can
Yes_Jesus_Can

@LeninTime @straker 

I'll answer this:

Because what you support is based on lies, and you need all the props you can get to deliver your demagoguery. 

honested
honested

@straker 

"Professional Victim Industry", ............you mean like companies whining they have to pay living wages in the United States and using it as an excuse to hire slaves elsewhere?

honested
honested

@td1234 @honested @straker 

Keep telling yourself that while comparing it to REAL employment opportunities and wage curves over the last 30 years.

Granted, if you are a hedge fund manager or have managed to be born into a huge inheritance, there's no time like the present.

Otherwise, your position is much more myth than reality.

td1234
td1234

@honested Really? How have wages gone for STEM degrees over the past 30 years? How have wages gone for Medical degrees gone in the past 30 years? 

JohnnyReb
JohnnyReb

@td1234 @honested @straker - you are being too nice, but again its early.


People who think flipping hamburgers should pay a living wage demonstrate their complete lack of workplace knowledge.  I could call them idiots, but again its early.


They completely overlook that within a workplace there is a pecking order.  If the minimum wage is raised, everyone above is looking an increase to keep the separation based on their job skills and seniority.


A forced minimum wage hike will overtime work its way through wages and consumer products and those minimum wage earners will be right back to where they started.


LeninTime
LeninTime

@JohnnyReb @td1234 @honested @straker

People who think flipping hamburgers should pay a living wage demonstrate their complete lack of workplace knowledge.  I could call them idiots, but again its early.

***

You're not super-bright are you? 

honested
honested

@td1234 @honested 

Could you provide the data that support your suggestion?

Especially comparing all graduates against all job openings?

Then, could we evaluate the broad availability of employment opportunities and include the scurrilous number of tax exemptions given to companies that offshore jobs?

JohnnyReb
JohnnyReb

@honested @JohnnyReb @td1234 @straker - living wage set me off as it is tied to the push to raise the minimum wage.


As to off shore or outsourcing jobs, companies are in the business to make profits.  They are not established to give people jobs.  A company will find a way to produce at the lowest feasible price possible.  There will be some who manufacture in America even though it costs them slightly more, but not to the point of not making a decent return on investment.

LeninTime
LeninTime

@JohnnyReb @honested @td1234 @straker

As to off shore or outsourcing jobs, companies are in the business to make profits.  They are not established to give people jobs

***
And now that you've conceded the moral bankruptcy of your ideological position, what other nuggets of dipsh!$$ery do you have to offer us?

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@JohnnyReb @honested @td1234 @straker "As to off shore or outsourcing jobs, companies are in the business to make profits.  They are not established to give people jobs."

And governments are not in the business of enabling businesses to make profits at the expense of actual citizens.  If business does not care to support the economic health of the nation as a whole, then the nation as a whole has no obligation to provide infrastructure, police and fire protection and military defense for them.



honested
honested

@JohnnyReb @honested @td1234 @straker 

So they have lost the concept made famous by Henry Ford in ensuring their employees have an opportunity to afford their products.

Clearly massive increases in tarriffs while abandoning the 'free trade' efforts shoved down our collective throats by nut getrich are in order.

td1234
td1234

@honested @JohnnyReb @td1234 @straker "

Key Findings
  • In 2013, there were 5.7 million total postings in STEM fields. Of those, 76%, or 4.4 million, require at least a bachelor’s degree, and 41%, or 2.3 million, are entry-level jobs requiring less than 2 years of experience.

  • 48% of all entry-level jobs requiring a bachelor’s degree or higher (BA+) are in STEM fields, while only 29% of bachelor’s degree graduates earn a STEM degree. At the sub-baccalaureate level (Sub-BA), 24% of entry-level jobs are in STEM fields, while 32% of Sub-BA degrees are in STEM concentrations.

  • There are 2.5 entry-level job postings for each new 4-year graduate in STEM fields compared to 1.1 postings for each new BA graduate in non-STEM fields.

  • STEM jobs offer a substantial salary premium. The average advertised salary for entry-level STEM jobs requiring a BA or higher is $66,123 compared to $52,299 for non-STEM jobs. This difference of approximately $14,000 represents a 26% premium. At the Sub-BA level, the average advertised entry-level salary is $47,856 for STEM jobs and $37,424 for non-STEM jobs. This difference of over $10,000 represents a 28% premium."

honested
honested

@td1234 @honested @JohnnyReb @straker 

Thanks, and that points to those who have talents in the STEM fields and made the correct gamble to major in a STEM field.

What about the rest of the Graduates or about the rest of the employee base?

Pointing to a weak bright spot doesn't excuse special tax treatment for offshoring jobs which was the point I made initially.

You win a star for such excellent deflection, as usual!

td1234
td1234

@honested @straker Wages are paid to people based on their education, skill sets and the value they give to the company. If a person wants to be paid more than do the necessary work to make yourself more valuable to the company. 

LeftisnotRight
LeftisnotRight

Race baiting industry is in decline, getting harder and harder for them to stir it up......which is dangerous because tactics to remain viable will get more extreme. We see it now.

JohnnyReb
JohnnyReb

@LeftisnotRight - retiring Sharpton and Jackson would greatly reduce the false rhetoric and be the overwhelming best interest of the group they claim to represent.


With the Ferguson shooting certified legal and nothing that Sharpton pushed being true, his credibility should put him under a rock permanently.  Instead, he will continue to go the White House getting Obama's ear and blacks will give him a pass like they have repeatedly.

LeninTime
LeninTime

@JohnnyReb @LeftisnotRight

retiring Sharpton and Jackson 

***
But what would people such as yourself have to get your blood pressure up about without the likes of Sharpton around? 

The way I see it, no one depends on their presence more than people like you.

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@JohnnyReb @LeftisnotRight "With the Ferguson shooting certified legal"


Wasn't.  There is no provision for *proving* that something was legal in our justice system.  There is only 'guilty' and 'acquittal.'


The Scottish justice system provides for a third verdict, 'not proven.' in which the court acknowledges that serious questions regarding the accused party's culpability, but also acknowledging the fact that the prosecution did not present sufficient evidence to convict beyond the shadow of a doubt.


Just FYI, acquittal does NOT mean 'certified legal.'

JohnnyReb
JohnnyReb

I saw where Lukovich tried tying Selma to voter ID.


Until those opposed to voter ID show where the law states only black people must have ID they have no case.


And as usual, Lukovich is off on a planet of his own.  As long as the AJC hangs on to him, it will continue to be a Liberal rag.


Blacks want equality and they should have it.  If every other race can provide ID, then blacks should also and stop the whining. 

Tuna Meowt
Tuna Meowt

@JohnnyReb "And as usual, Lukovich is off on a planet of his own."


Planet Pulitzer.


Must really chap your behind.