And that’s indeed the way the world goes ’round

Here’s a nice, breezy way to end the week, courtesy of the young ladies from Della Mae:

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81 comments
Recon2/3
Recon2/3

MES and Libs, just don't know American life sadly beyond their far-left brainwashed ideology. I love America now and  back to our wonderful history.

Recon2/3
Recon2/3

Not too much on Jay's former celebrated FNM. It does, however, give him a long weekend break, while the poorest of gubers enjoy their otherwise lonely weekends.

YouLibs
YouLibs

@Recon2/3


Do they not have a newspaper in the part of Florida you moved to?



MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

I know I'm the only one who can see my education post below.


No sweat!  I just placed it on Maureen Downey's blog.  So there!  ;-)


Not there, either, now.  Oh, well.  I tried.

Kamchak
Kamchak

@Philo_Farnsworth 

I'm pretty sure you are the only one who gives a rip.

I am 100% positive that you are wrong, cruising-behind-shopping-centers boy

elgrunir
elgrunir

Okay, you three:

BRUNO

JAMVET

MARYELIZABETHSINGS


I'll put your fresh limericks as responses to your latest post

elgrunir
elgrunir

Oh, man...


Looks like I'm a little late to the party :(


Anyway, welcome back, Jam!


Bruno! :)


And ME Sings, hiya!


Got fresh limericks...

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@elgrunir


Hi ya back, elgrunir!  Looking forward to reading all three limericks.  Do a good job, and I may print out mine and frame it!!  ;-)

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@elgrunir 


Loved all three, elgrunir!  What talent you have and by that I mean insight.  If you had any talent with visual arts at all, I think that your art work would be great!  Whimsical, airy, and delightful.  Look up on google all of John Lennon's lithographs which Yoko Ono is marketing.  In the long run, Lennon may be known more for his art than for his music.


Anyway, I went to the latest exhibit in town in Roswell last weekend and saw many more of his art works.  So funny - with such an ironic wit.  The one I have in my home is called, "He tried to reach the stars, but no one returned his calls."  It's on the internet.  Yoko put in the color herself on all of his sketches.  The lightness and humor, and personal touch, remind me of you.  A career in art perhaps?

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@elgrunir 


Glad to read that you value intuition, elgrunir.  It's a source of insight than many will not acknowledge.  Also, teaching certainly counts as acting.  My acting background surely came in handy for me when I was a young English teacher in my early 30s.  How I got my 9th and 10 grade students through the English classes in which we had to read a Shakespearean play was for me to read all the parts, while acting all the parts, around the room, myself.  It worked because the kids were entertained seeing me get the "ham" out of my system, with enthusiasm, to an audience which could not leave the room. Just having them silently read Shakespeare or even orally read it together just didn't cut it.  Boring. Some kids have no acting talent or oral interpretation skills, and the others are bored by them.  Some couldn't even pronounce some of the words. ;-)


They did like, however, their Shakespearean group projects in which I let them be quite creative.  One advanced English class turned "Romeo and Juliet" into a Wild West drama set in the 1800s in America. Funny!  Cowboys, not princes and knights, and Juliet was a pretty cowgirl. Guns, not swords!  (Not real guns, of course!)

elgrunir
elgrunir

@MaryElizabethSings


Glad you liked them, Mary Elizabeth!


Insight... hmmm... it's a mixture of observing motivation, style, and reactions.  I reverse-engineer things when I have substantial information and understanding follows.  I keep in mind that my preferences and perspectives are not the "be all, end all" of the way things should be; on the other hand, I like to lend a seasoned, honed look at things where I have experience, real or intuited.


As for visual arts, I'm bloody awful!  Seriously, part of my love for geometry exists because I can draw the structured figures.  The closest I come to having any visually artistic talent is when I cook simple food with my personal tangents; things look good and taste good.


In other artistic bailiwicks I actually have some goods: writing, singing, and acting (though the latest hasn't had any formal action since grade school, unless teaching counts (as it should)).


I've already noted your recommendation about the John Lennon / Yoko Ono lithographs and I'll probably have a good look on the Internet tomorrow before my 5:00 appointment.


Cheers!

Bruno2
Bruno2

Welcome back, Jam.  It sure was quiet on FNM when you were gone.

I'm planning on renting "The Theory of Everything" as well, even though I'm not as much of a Stephen Hawking fan as I should be.  I'm more of a Richard Feynman fan.  I'm surprised a movie about him hasn't been attempted yet.  Lord knows there's enough material about Feynman to fill 2 movies between the human interest side and the scientific side. In the meantime, I rented "The Imitation Game" last night, which is the (somewhat embellished) story of Alan Turning.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZzEzDkeHzI

elgrunir
elgrunir

@Bruno2 



BRUNO MARS?


This Bruno, he’s not from Mars

(though he garages six Edsel cars)

His dry sense of humor

Grows on you like a tumor

The only cure?Go hit the bars


JamVet
JamVet

Good morning, Bookmaniacs.

Back from the sunny Mediterranean.

What an experience! 

Venice, Istanbul, Mykonos, Athens, Naples, Florence, Rome, Toulon, Barcelona and Lisbon.

I have no idea what time zone I'm in or what day it is; I'm just glad to be back in Cali!

Watched a great film on the flight back yesterday, The Theory of Everything.

Tons of great music in it, much of it semi-classical but it started with this one from 1963 when Hawking was at Cambridge...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5k0GDQrK2jo


MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@JamVet 


Welcome back, JamVet.  Yes, "The Theory of Everything" was a fine movie, very uplifting, also.  Hawking's first wife, Jane, with whom he is still close, was the main reason he found the courage to live such a long, productive life.  Unorthodox life, but so inspiring.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@JamVet 


Yes, I bought "A Brief History of Time" many years ago, but never finished it.  Must get it back out again and read the whole thing.  Incredible that Hawking has lived to be in his early 70s and has 3 children by Jane and several grandchildren, as a result. His kids said that they used to play tricks on him when they were kids with his wheelchair.  Forget what the antics were, but they all had fun.


Btw, I am about half way through reading a fine book by Annette Gordon-Reed, entitled "The Hemingses of Monticello."  I recommend it highly for anyone who is not satisfied to see Jefferson or Sally Hemings as the typical stereotypes of master/slave of their day.  You have to read all 665 pages to understand this time and place in history, and these two unique people, with some depth.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@JamVet


Btw, I should have written the word, "one," not the word, "you," above.  Was really informing all readers of that excellent book by Gordon-Reed.


Have a great day, Jam.  And, don't sweat the small stuff.  As I age, I often don't know the date or the hour, and it's not because of jet lag.  ;-)

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@MaryElizabethSings @JamVet 

Glad to hear that you are rounding out your study of Jefferson by reading this 2008 book by the scholar who, almost single-handedly in the mid-1990s, challenged the old idea that the revered Jefferson could never have fathered any of his slave's children, and it was irrelevant to his political ideas anyway. Alone among the scholars then, Gordon-Reed took the oral family history of the Hemings family seriously.  Then the 1998 DNA test came out that substantiated her claims.


As a black professor educated at Harvard, Gordon-Reed is one of those Civil Rights activists arguing that the black voices are part of history too.

elgrunir
elgrunir

@JamVet 



JAMVET RETURNS LIMERICK


“Come back!” I pleaded to Jam

“If it’s true that you’re out on the lam”

His golf game is pure

Of that I am sure

Oh yeah--I just posted spam


elgrunir
elgrunir

@MaryElizabethSings



MARY ELIZABETH SINGS


Of Mary Elizabeth Sings

To kindness and justice she clings

Her secret to life

Is for all to be rife

With joy, and not so much things


MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@OriginalProf 



Have you read this particular book by Annette Gordon-Reed, Prof?  From your earlier comments about Jefferson and Hemings, I did not ascertain that you understood the depth of differing positions and emotions that both of these unique people, more than likely, embodied.  Gordon-Reed does much speculation, based on facts, but also on the particular mores going on in Jefferson's mind and at Monticello, as a reflection of his unique mind and spirit in that era of our history.  Hemings actually seems his equal, not only because she is a spiritual equal as a human being, but also because she seems to understand intellectually the nature of the rules and mores of society vs. personal needs and decisions way beyond those group mores (like Jefferson), a very intelligent trait for a girl of 16 who is a few months pregnant with Jefferson's child in Paris.  If anything, I have even more admiration for Jefferson than I had previously.  The reasons are in the nuances in which he lives in his world but is so far above it, in intellect and in heart.


Really, I do not want to pursue this conversation with you any further.  Our perceptions are too varied to have a meeting of the minds.  Oh, and I also finished the book on Jefferson which I purchased at the Atlanta History Center on Jefferson and his slaves, which the NY Times, called invaluable.  I recomment that you read that one, also.  It limits itself to facts known but does not reach the depths of insight that Gordon-Reed reaches, which is aligned with what I had suspected about Jefferson's motivations from my previous readings.  Btw, I have known about Gordon-Reed for years.  You so underestimate my intellectual background, Prof.  

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@elgrunir 


Nailed me, elgrunir.  Why am I not surprised that you understand me in my core?!  That one gets printed out and framed!  Thanks, much!!

gotalife
gotalife

The rw are way behind on figuring out our culture change.


Psst, they follow the Pope's who am I to judge.


A real Christian did that.

gotalife
gotalife

Obama Marks Immigrant Heritage Month :


In honor of Immigrant Heritage Month, U.S. President Barack Obama wants Americans to share the stories of their families' immigrant roots.


In his weekly address Saturday, Obama urged Americans to go to The New Americans Project website to tell their stories.


"We are a nation of immigrants. It's a source of strength and something we can take pride in," he said.


The president also said, "We can't just celebrate this heritage, we have to defend it by fixing our broken immigration system."


In your face.      

IReportYouWhine#1
IReportYouWhine#1

Can't leave politics out of a funeral? People like this are dangerous, they don't respect anything. It's all about them and their petty grievances. 


Have personal tragedy, will hijack it.

Kamchak
Kamchak

@FIGMO2 

 Fool 'em once, shame on him. Fool 'em twice, shame on them. 

Nathan Deal says, "What?"

skydog12
skydog12

Hey YouLibs,


My brisket came out marvelous last weekend. The leftovers were even better. I made brisket Arepas the next day. Very easy. I also did the Kisser rolls and horseradish sauce, fine eats.

For Arepas:

Get some P.A.N. flour, (Some Walmarts have it) 


Mix with water and make thin pancakes. Make golf balls and smash flat with a pan. Wax paper makes it easier. Much thicker consistency than pancakes and they take longer to cook than pancakes, approx 5 minutes per side.


Put brisket and "kicky sauce" on them.


Kickey sauce: 3 Jalapeno peppers, 1 cup mayo, handful of cilantro, 2 garlic cloves, splash of olive oil in blender. Let sit 2 hours.


YouLibs
YouLibs

@skydog12


Awesome, bro, when you can cook a brisket over coals you are a grill master. Seriously.


I wrote down your recipes, but I'm looking for a rib opportunity the next time I cook.


I just built a house for one of my best friends and I cooked ribs for all the people who made it happen (everybody but the HVAC cretins). They came out sooo good and I've been wanting to do it again for a few weeks now.


Praise be to Hickory Smoke.


Amen


p.s. - the guys I play music with swear that rib grease on your fingers and lips makes you play better. My research in that area tends to support their assertions.

OriginalProf
OriginalProf

@YouLibs @skydog12 

Nahhhh--what you need is a crock-pot and some Jack Daniels BBQ sauce to spread on top of the ribs. Scrape off what fat you can first.  6 hours on Low and you're good to go.


This is from the Yankee who has never barbecued anything on a grill in her life. Throw a can of tuna on the grill and I'm fine.

YouLibs
YouLibs

@OriginalProf @YouLibs @skydog12


I hear you prof, there are many ways to cook barbecue and most of them come to a good result. 


I just grew up smelling and tasting the wonderful barbecue done by a woman whose name I can only recall as "Mrs. Barton" at the Julian Smith Casino in Augusta in the fifties and sixties. The JSC was a Works Corps Project after the Great Depression designed by Harry Olmstead, the father of American landscape architecture. As the water of the infamous hazards of Rae's Creek ruin the Sunday hopes of many a famous golfer at the Masters Tournament, they emerge within a mile into Lake Olmstead, on whose shores Mrs. Barton did her cooking.


It was open pit, hickory fired, whole hog barbecue. I lived almost a mile away on the other side of the lake and I knew it every time she cooked.


If you wanted to raise money, you sold tickets to one of her barbecues. If you wanted to get elected, you held fundraisers at the Casino.


Her barbecue is the benchmark I shoot for when I fire up my grill. It requires many hours over low heat and hickory smoke.


There's nothing else like it.

skydog12
skydog12

@YouLibs @skydog12


Libs,


I have a hundred BBQ receipts for ribs, but I only use this one.


Marinade the ribs (floating) in Sesame oil overnight or 2 days is better. Dry rub of salt, pepper, garlic power, and onion power. Cook on indirect heat for 3 1/2 hours. Hickory, pecan or apple wood chips/chunks.


You can use the "Texas Crutch" if they are getting too dark at the end of cooking.