The time for choosing having arrived, will Ga. GOP choose Trump?

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Back in July, I wrote a light-hearted piece trying to imagine the acceptance speech that Donald Trump might give at the 2016 Republican convention. The notion that such a speech might actually take place, that Trump really might be standing on the stage in Cleveland this summer,  basking in the national spotlight as the GOP nominee, didn’t seem real.

Well, it seems real now. Republican voters in Georgia, Alabama, Virginia and other states are going to the polls today, and are expected to give Trump a resounding victory. The Republican establishment, still trying to rally itself behind Marco Rubio, is now focusing on the March 15 primary in Florida as its last stand.

And even there, the signs are ominous. The RealClear polling average for Florida gives Trump a lead of almost 20 points in Rubio’s home state.  Early voting and absentee voting is already underway in Florida, and by the time March 15 rolls around, roughly half the ballots in the state will already have been cast.

According to Daniel Smith, a political science professor at the University of Florida, 580,000 absentee ballots had already been received by election supervisors as of Friday. More than 300,000 of those ballots were cast by Republicans, and according to Smith, almost 131,000 came from Republicans who were registered to vote back in 2012 but didn’t bother to vote in that year’s crucial GOP primary.

But they’re coming out this year, accounting for almost 44 percent of the 2016 primary electorate.

“These low propensity voters – who were registered as GOP four years ago but weren’t compelled to vote for other non-establishment candidates, such as Michele Bachmann or Ron Paul or Herman Cain, to name a few of the GOP contenders that year – may be a good sign for Donald Trump,” Smith concludes.

The likelihood of a Trump nomination is also placing other GOP officials in a delicate position.

“There’s no place in our society for racism and bigotry, and I found Mr. Trump’s response to David Duke and the KKK disgusting and offensive,” New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte said Monday. But not so disgusting and offensive that Ayotte would refuse to back Trump in the general election. Her campaign made clear that ““Senator Ayotte intends to support the Republican nominee.”

Sen. John Cornyn made a similar statement. “It’s just implausible to me that (Trump) doesn’t know who David Duke is or what his history is. So that’s deeply troubling,” Cornyn said. But he immediately went on to confirm that “I’ll support the party’s nominee — to do otherwise is to basically to support Hillary Clinton — and I’m not going to do that.”

Some are making the opposite call.

“This latest is more than utterly disgusting,” writes Stuart Stevens, a longtime GOP political strategist who ran Mitt Romney’s 2012 campaign.  “It really makes it impossible to pretend that Trump is not only an idiot but also a racist idiot.”

He then pens a powerful summation:

“If Trump wins the nomination, politicians who support him will be acquiescing to, if not actively aiding, his hate. Donors, including the corporate donors, whom every convention depends on for support, cannot support a man with Trump’s unbalanced, bigoted views. How can any corporation justify to its board that it donated funds to support a bigot?

If the Republican Party stands for nothing but winning elections, it deserves to lose. It will with Trump. But on the day after the election, the pain will not be just that the White House, the Senate, and possibly the House of Representatives are now in Democratic hands.

No, the greatest pain will be from the shame of pretending that an evil man was not evil and a hater really didn’t mean what he said. We hold elections every two years, and there is always the chance to regain lost offices. But there is no mechanism to regain one’s dignity and sense of decency once squandered.

That defeat is permanent. To support Trump is to support a bigot. It’s really that simple.”

It really is.

Reader Comments 0

1043 comments
ALLENFACEMIRE
ALLENFACEMIRE

Congress is up for grabs. We Democrats have a real chance of leveling the playing field, which is particularly important if the Donald by some act of political fantasy, wins the White House.

Trump doesn't scare me as much as an electorate who may put him there. These are our friends, neighbors and co-workers.

I shutter to think the majority of our country believe the most viable candidate to run The United States, is Donald Trump.

Can this really be happening?

Or like I want to believe, Trumps's nomination will coalesce the Democrats AND the Republicans into a Hillary ground swell, also sweeping the do nothing congress of the dead wood that has stymied any real progress during the past 8 years.

Hillary has more baggage than Delta. Trump has more issues than National Geographic but given the choice...there really isn't one.

I still believe in our political system although the current political climate screams for a viable 3rd party. But would that third party be moderate or extreme?

That discussion aside, I'm still hoping cooler heads will prevail in November when it becomes apparent what our only choices are.

popgun
popgun

I should have said "of whom I speak..."

popgun
popgun

Anything other than a vote for Trump, or any other nominee - should it not be Trump, is a vote for Hillary. It's that simple. There's no such thing for a Republican voter as "sitting out an election. You either vote for the nominee of your party, or you are giving a vote to the Democrat nominee.


Debbie, Trump is not a bigot. Your not listening to him. You are hearing what the press wants for you to hear--Your the idiot of which I speak above.

f22ev
f22ev

As a former compassionate, conservative Republican; I see Trump as what the current Republican party (and Fox and radio talking heads) have created, just look at current Georgia Legislature law proposals.  The Georgia Republican party, as well as those taking over many northern states, have tossed those like me and Kasich out of the tea partied Republican party.  Sad to be a RINO.

CommonSenseisntCommon
CommonSenseisntCommon

@f22ev wear that label proudly and possibly a Conservative Party will emerge that will be a reminder of the movement that it once was.

DebbieDoRight
DebbieDoRight

If the Republican Party stands for nothing but winning elections, it deserves to lose. It will with Trump. But on the day after the election, the pain will not be just that the White House, the Senate, and possibly the House of Representatives are now in Democratic hands.

No, the greatest pain will be from the shame of pretending that an evil man was not evil and a hater really didn’t mean what he said. We hold elections every two years, and there is always the chance to regain lost offices. But there is no mechanism to regain one’s dignity and sense of decency once squandered.

That defeat is permanent. To support Trump is to support a bigot. It’s really that simple.”

JGarland
JGarland

While they will deny, deny, Rush and his right wing - well funded by the way - have brought to life their Frakenstein. And Fox News cannot be absolved from complicity.

As a Democratic, I also yearn for the necessity of a strong two party system and intellectual discourse. Maybe this election year returns all of us to that foundation of democracy.

JGarland
JGarland

deloachconsulting@comcast.net

YouLibs
YouLibs

@Finn-McCool 

Thanks, we've gotten kinda slack giving each other that heads up lately.

Orange15
Orange15

I have never seen as many people turn out for a Presidential Primary. If you haven't voted, get out there and vote to make America Great Again!

YouLibs
YouLibs

@Orange15 

America has never not been great.


That said, I was surprised by the number of people at my polling place today. It looked more like a general than a primary.

Eye wonder
Eye wonder

@RaindroidWillBoy

Given the people currently supporting him, that's the kind of endorsement that's likely to lose him votes. I wonder how much Preibus, McConnell and Ryan had to pay Farrakhan for that one.

JamVet
JamVet

The longer the fake Christian, fake Republican, fake conservative is around, the longer and worse the damage to the already hyper-dysfunctional GOP.


One of the best descriptions yet:

He is a pro-abortion liberal masquerading as a conservative, who preys on nationalistic, tribal tendencies and has an army of white supremacists online as his loudest cheerleaders.

Peachs
Peachs

Hell I think I can trust him, more then the Republicans, You won't mixed God into his decision-making. I think he will give us a more liberal justice, then Obama can give right now because of his political position.

Kamchak
Kamchak

Spealking of conspiracy nutz -- Info wars is losing it today.

YouLibs
YouLibs

@Kamchak @DownInAlbany 

I do know one burned out ex-hippie who claimed he was so far up in the acid-producing pyramid on the West Coast that he carefully avoided being in the same place at the same time with "Kid Charlemagne" Stanley Owlsley. He is an InfoWars listener and used to be a lib


BTW, today he is a prepper and gun hoarder and hates all libs except me. I'll bet he's reblueing an assault weapon and listening to his short-wave radio as we speak.

RaindroidWillBoy
RaindroidWillBoy

How much did the DNC pay Duke to perform his civic duty?

consumedconsumer
consumedconsumer

@RaindroidWillBoy


does it always have to be a conspiracy? 


sometimes the planets simply align and even the most despicable among us finds a kindred spirit to rally behind.

TBS
TBS

In your words.. Who cares?