‘… drinking mad-dog margaritas and not caring where you are’

The great Guy Clark died this week. Most people probably never heard of him — he was much better known as a songwriter than performer — but the Texas native played a critical role in the outlaw-country movement that for a time attempted to redeem country music.

He’s been described as the poet of the movement, and if you listen to his songs it’s an apt description.

Here’s one of my favorites, “Dublin Blues.”

 

Rest in peace, Mr. Clark. The rest of you, have a great weekend.

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43 comments
TomMiddleton
TomMiddleton

@skydog12 

Every time you play this lady, I get amped, Skydog, but his one is particularly good. Always thought it was too short as it was, but in my opinion, Susan did it just about right for a change.  Thanks much for the post.

JeffreyEav
JeffreyEav

I know about Guy because of Steve Earle, so I gotta share my favorite Steve Earle story. Townes told Steve to read two books. I Buried My Heary At Wounded Knee and War and Peace. Steve breezed through Wounded Knee but was struggling with War and Peace. Townes told him to stick with it.

When Steve finally finished reading War and Peace, Townes asked him to tell him all about it. That's when Steve Earle realized Townes Van Zant never read War and Peace.

skydog12
skydog12

@JeffreyEav


I never made it through W&P or Les Miserables.


Tell me what I missed?


About that same period I was playing Louie Louie on 33 1/3 to see what they were saying. It was supposed to be nasty.

JeffreyEav
JeffreyEav

Me neither. But I do own a Gibson

JeffreyEav
JeffreyEav

I learned the words of Louie Louie at 11. No google. Had a tape of all different versions.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

"Dublin Blues" - very nice.  Melodious and intimate.  "I wisht I was in Austin."  

_GodlessHeathen_
_GodlessHeathen_

VC - I promised a review of the Jason Isbell performance in Macon last Wednesday.  Of course, being a fan of his, I thought it was great, but there elements of the show that really set it apart in my mind.
For instance, lighting.  Not usually something I notice but for this show it really was exceptional.  Mostly backlighting and clusters of colored rays of light.  And fake smoke - lots of fake smoke.
Amanda Shires was along and I came away with a better appreciation of her fiddle abilities.


And for the last song before obligatory pre-encore break, Jason was brought yet another guitar and he put it on and then looked at and said, "This is not my guitar."
Then he started telling about a skinny kid hanging around the studios in Muscle Shoals trying to get on records and finally played on a Wilson Pickett record.  Of course he was talking about Duane Allman.
And the guitar he was about to play was Duane's 1957 Goldtop Les Paul.  Brought over from the Big House Museum for the boy from Muscle Shoals to play.
Isbell played Duane's guitar.  Didn't play guitar like DA or a guitar like DA's, he played Duane's effin guitar!!!!  You can imagine the Macon crowd's reaction.

After the break he played a tribute for Merle and they closed with this song.  Sadler played the Les Paul on it.

https://youtu.be/jg30VT55fnQ

JeffreyEav
JeffreyEav

That's freaking cool. I've been planning a trip to the big house since I was a skinny kid

JeffreyEav
JeffreyEav

I'm actually hoping for the Friday after Memorial Day. Kids will be away.

skydog12
skydog12

@_GodlessHeathen_ @JeffreyEav


Also go to Rose Hill Cemitary where Skydog and Berry Oakly are buried.

I`m not much into grave sites, but you can see where these dudes partied. The first album cover was shot here. Not far from the brothers grave is Elizabeth Reeds grave. 

Rose Hill is on the river and beautiful.

YouLibs
YouLibs

@_GodlessHeathen_ @JeffreyEav


The last time I was in town I bought a t-shirt and had Mama Louise autograph it. I wish I had noticed the marker wasn't permanent.


I asked her if she was really as close to Duane as people had said and she said she had thought of him as her other son. She said they sat at the table right beside the front door for over an hour one night just before he died and talked and talked.


Then she broke down and cried.

Visual_Cortex
Visual_Cortex

Kinda neutral on the FNM topic, so I'll throw this out there for discussion and take your answers off the air (back later)--


How do you feel when you hear some beloved piece of your musical past being appropriated for a TV commercial?


For me, I had to ask that when I heard this used to promote... Audi!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDNzQ3CXspU

PaulinNH
PaulinNH

@Visual_Cortex  "How do you feel when you hear some beloved piece of your musical past being appropriated for a TV commercial?"// 

That Michael Jackson should be beaten to death with Nike shoes for selling Revolution for a commercial.

Visual_Cortex
Visual_Cortex

@PaulinNH @Visual_Cortex

beaten to death with Nike shoes for selling Revolution for a commercial.

Funny you should mention--wayy back then, just after the infamous Revolution ad, Nike ran these crazy, grainy ads that featured runners VOMITING, post race.

The soundtrack? Search and Destroy. And it... kinda fit!

PaulinNH
PaulinNH

@skydog12 @Visual_Cortex  "Record companies like to make money, and that is their only goal. They do not care about the content that they sell - they care about maximizing their profits. It is because of this that I hate record companies with the same passion that I hate venture capitalists. The record companies do not try to foster a creative environment which rewards musicians who serve their respective niche, but create an environment which attempts to market a small amount of music to the largest audience possible. It is more profitable for the record company to sell a few decent records in bulk than to have a vast array of cult hits that sell decently. " Numair Faraz

skydog12
skydog12

@Visual_Cortex


That horse has been out of the barn for decades. What can anybody do?


You think politics is a cut throat game? Here is what Hunter S Thompson said about the music business.


“The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.”