Time to lift your nose from the grindstone, people!

The great Merle Haggard takes us into the Labor Day weekend … enjoy!

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27 comments
omark
omark

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-politics/wp/2016/09/01/trump-pays-irs-a-penalty-for-his-foundation-violating-rules-with-gift-to-florida-attorney-general/

This looks bad. Evidently the Clinton foundation made a significant political contribution, to the campaign, of a politician investigating Hillary. The investigation was subsequently closed. Looks suspicious to say the least. I expect the news will be full of it.

Wait a minute, it wasn’t Hillary. It was the Donald. Never mind.

straker
straker

Some in Big Business would gladly take us back to the time of 6 day work weeks, 12 hour work days, no paid vacations, no paid sick leave, no health insurance, no paid overtime, and child labor.

Some in our far right Congress would be OK with this as long as the corporate contributions kept coming in.


Only in America. 

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@straker


Thank you for your very clear words.  This is what I had wanted to communicate when I mentioned the need for the "humanization of corporations."


Perhaps, the need is greater than that.  Perhaps, the need is for the greater "humanization" of all of us, which will show forth in service more than in greed.  George Washington comes to mind as an example to us all.

honested
honested

@straker 

They are starting with limiting healthcare coverage and wage increases,......and of course Taxes..

How did we ever fall for the 'producers know what's best for us' BS?

omark
omark

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qIHN68YNXwhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qIHN68YNXw

 This deals with the Ludlow massacre. It’s a little longer than I’d normally post. I seriously doubt it’s covered in Texas’s history books. They’re more concerned about the time Jesus helped James Madison write the Constitution.

Most Americans don’t like history very much. Given what they’ve been taught, I don’t blame them. Still it’s kind of a shame. It’s hard to know where you are, if you can’t remember where you’ve been.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@omark


Studying history helps us to understand how far we have come in human rights in making into reality the ideals of this nation's beginnings, forming a "more perfect Union," and forming a more perfect world, continuously.


The struggle goes on in terms of fighting for the opportunity of everyone to have profit-free medical care and profit-free education through college, for those who have that potential, and skill based education for those who do not.


Vote Hillary Clinton and keep the struggle going for the rights of the common man and woman and to insure that our American Supreme Court justices will see with those same eyes toward this nation's, and this world's, future.


P.S. I enjoy studying history from the standpoint of the historical figures who have been instrumental in changing our world for the better.  Perhaps others would see history as not so "remote" and "dry" if they looked more closely into the choices made by the characters of history when they walked the earth.

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

@omark


P.S.  This continuous evolution of the better angels of humankind's nature, must not only include medical and educational reform, but the humanization of corporations (in the best sense of that word) for the reaching of humanity's higher goals.

FIGMO2
FIGMO2

Fifteen comments?

They're probably downstairs without their noses.

schnirt

omark
omark

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUpBSvN1a50

Happy Labor Day.  As a young man, I was told to find work I loved, and it would never feel like work. Good advice, but I never could quite pull it off myself. I’m sincerely jealous of people that are enthralled with their careers.

I’ve never had a career, but I’ve always had a job, or two. In the process, I’ve had a lot of employers. As a whole they’re a very diverse group. However, they’ve been very consistent in one regard. They all thought that we worker types should love our jobs.  I wanted to, but I just couldn’t quite pull it off. My employer wanted me to love them, but I just wanted to be friends.

Sadly, I never discovered exciting fulfilling work. That said, my life hasn’t been a dreary death march. I enjoy all kinds of cool stuff when I’m not working.

This Labor day enjoy yourselves, but give a moment of thanks to the brave souls that gave us weekends and reasonable work hours. These weren’t gifts bestowed on us by benevolent job creators. Red neck coal miners literally died for these rights.

TomMiddleton
TomMiddleton

@omark 

I've found that the perfect balance we need for the often boring, self-limiting workaday world of making a living – the box, if you will - is having something creative we can do to help us move beyond ourselves wherever and whenever that need should arise.

It's said that the soul lives to create, and since the soul is who we all are in our dreams of how it really should be, allowing it full expression on occasion through creativity, not only gives us the presence to become more but the freedom to keep on going.


Infraredguy
Infraredguy

Hillary loves good music her favorite is " I don't recall "

Infraredguy
Infraredguy

Time for a little Swamp Music from Lynyrd Skynard

MaryElizabethSings
MaryElizabethSings

This selection is meant to honor my second husband who worked for 42 years of his life, straight up, before he died at age 60, in 2007.  Our daughter was 25. He was a French immigrant who had served in the U. S. Navy for 3 years.  He had been the first state sales manager for Georgia for an Italian wine distributor when we were first married.  He, later, owned his own business for 5 years of salad dressings he had created, via his recipes, himself, and had sold his salad dressings up and down the East Coast until one corporation bought out another and his products were cut in the process. 


The last 17 years of his life he had labored in retail for various grocery corporations, first as a wine steward, and then in other areas.  He coped with that tedium by changing jobs or companies about every two years.  At the end of his life, Walmart would not allow a transfer, even with his doctor's statement of need, so my husband had enough pride and strength to go out and get a full time job at Home Depot when he was 60 years old.  He had gone into his last WalMart store to finalize paperwork before moving on to Home Depot when he had his major stroke on the floor of that WalMart store just before he had signed those papers.  He died 3 days later in the hospital, having lost all consciousness after 12 hours.  He was completely physically and emotionally worn out.  But, he never gave up.  Home Depot's management were so impressed with him that they sent him a beautiful bouquet of flowers for his funeral, as did his fellow workers at WalMart, with many notes included.  He had a joy for life, but not the education to have fulfilled his dreams and his capabilities, but he worked until the end of his life for our daughter and for me.  There was something artistic in his nature, but he did not enjoy theater as much as I did.  Once, we three had gone to see Marcel Marceau in Atlanta and he fell asleep and snored to our child's and my amusement in the balcony.  But, my husband did love the musical, "Les Miserable," and bought a recording of it that he would play in his beautiful truck, which he loved  This song is to honor this outstanding and classy man whom I was fortunate enough to have in my life for 29 years, and 30 St. Patrick's Days spent together, celebrating. 


This song captures his love and his spirit as both husband and father. How pleased I am to present him to this viewing audience, via this song from "Les Miserable."


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11tztqbLXAg


Infraredguy
Infraredguy

He did not appreciate Lynyrd Skynard ?

Paul42
Paul42

Appropriate song.