Opinion: Seven years of fantasy crashes to the ground

(AP)

For seven years, Washington Republicans have promised us over and over again that they had a plan to replace Obamacare. For those seven years, they never did the hard work, the debate, the policy construction, the consensus building both in Washington and around the country that would be needed to pass such a plan.

Today, on the seventh anniversary of the signing of Obamacare into law, they began to pay the price for those seven wasted years.  Republicans control the House, they control the Senate and they hold the White House, yet with the postponement of a House floor vote long scheduled for Thursday they have proved themselves incapable of taking even the first basic step in implementing their vision.

They don’t have the votes because they have no vision. Fantasies, but no vision. They have no vision because they lacked the political discipline and leadership to build that vision. They built a powerful political movement on hatred of Obamacare with no real idea of what they would do with power should they gain it.

They railed that Obamacare left 20 million uninsured, knowing full well that their own plan would more than double that number. They complained about high deductibles, hiding the fact that what plans they did have were founded upon deductibles that were even higher. They talked of saving Medicaid, always avoiding the reality that their plan to “save it” was to gut it.

And people have noticed.

Look at the numbers in the most recent Quinnipiac poll:

Just 17 percent of Americans support the GOP plan. More than three times as many say they oppose it. Even among Republicans, just 41 percent support their party’s plan. In another question, just 33 percent say they want to end support for Planned Parenthood. An enormous 85 percent of Americans say it is very important to them that “health insurance be affordable for all Americans,” while another 13 percent call it somewhat important.

That’s 98 percent, yet the Republican plan represents a huge step back from that goal, not by accident but by design. And again, people have noticed.

Last week, a gleeful House Speaker Paul Ryan celebrated the plan’s dramatic, $880 billion reductions in Medicaid. “We’ve been dreaming of this since I’ve been around ― since you and I were drinking at a keg,” he told Rich Lowry, editor of National Review.

Here’s what the American people have to say about that goal, again quoting Quinnipiac:

 

 

 

Just 22 percent share Ryan’s keg dream of gutting Medicaid. Just 39 percent of his fellow Republicans think it’s a good idea. Yet in the minds of Ryan and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, that’s a core accomplishment of their bill.

Even if they somehow shove this bill through the House, they know that if and when the legislation comes back from the Senate it will be considerably more moderate, and considerably more unacceptable to conservatives. What a complete and total mess.

 

Reader Comments 0

1387 comments
C_Casselberry
C_Casselberry

Tiny D, tell us all about this great DEFEAT. Bwahahahaha. Around the bowl and down the hole. He left it all on the field. I'd say it's smeared all over him.

quickdigits
quickdigits

Regardless of the Outcome of the GOP HealthCare Bill, Obamacare WILL Collapse Under its Own Weight. Just Wait and See!!

MadWizard
MadWizard

@quickdigits Sad that someone is so excited about the possibility of many people losing healthcare. America will be great again when we return to e pluribus unum. Tribalism is for the Stone Age.

StraightNoChaser
StraightNoChaser

In td's world separation of power is just a side note now that Trump is in the cross hairs.  That one there.  Wow

td1234
td1234

@StraightNoChaser He went to the Speaker of the House first, then the press and then the President. 


Democrats in the house are in the minority party and for all practical purposes does not matter.

StraightNoChaser
StraightNoChaser

@td1234 @StraightNoChaser The speaker of the house is not chain of command for the intel committee.  Intel committee consist of both Dems and Republicans who work together in secret in the basement of the house in a secret room.  The committee has nothing to do with who is in power, it consist of lawyers and prosecutors from both sides and is suppose to be bi-partisan.  When are you going back to school? Your education is outdated

KUTGF
KUTGF

GOP house has got to wonder..... do I vote for this bill that wont pass the Senate and take the heat for 50+ million it would harm plus the tax wealth gfiven to the rich or do I face the base with the fact that we promised repeal and replace with better which was a lie.  I think I would face the smaller base.   

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@KUTGF Vote "no", saying it's not good. The keep on saying "ObamaCare BAD!!!" and see if it still works. 

PaulinNH
PaulinNH

The information shared had nothing to do with the Russian investigation so therefore it was not a breach

Who knew that only releasing information about the Russian investigation is a breach of the rules?  The Chinese, Turks, Egyptians et al can all be happy knowing that the US never targets any of their officials for eavesdropping.

td1234
td1234

@PaulinNH What information did Nunes "release" to anyone besides the commander and chief that by law has the highest level of top secret clearance? 


BTW: That information about spying on our friends and enemies hit the fan during the Obama administration when they were caught spying on the German chancellor and the PM of Israel.  

DavidATL45
DavidATL45

@td1234 @PaulinNH There is a little something called the "Constitution" that embeds separation of power in the government.  Nunes undermined the Constitution when he went running like a 2nd grade tattle tell to the WH to tell Drumf that there might still be traitors on his staff.  Nunes' action is unforgiveable since the POTUS and his family might be the main traitors dealing with Putin.

ByteMe
ByteMe

Healthcare sheets....

StraightNoChaser
StraightNoChaser

@td1234 Nunes works for the country not Trump or the White House and when he receives any kind of intelligence he is suppose to share it with the  intelligence committee first.  It's called separation of powers.  Why is that hard for you too understand?  

StraightNoChaser
StraightNoChaser

@td1234 @StraightNoChaser In Nunes role as chair of the Intel committee he should not report first to the President, separation of powers is the law of the land.  You can spin all you want too, Nunes role on that committee has nothing to do with whether or not Trump is working for the country.  The separation of power is there to stop abuse of power by the President or anyone else who works in the government.

td1234
td1234

@StraightNoChaser First, second, third who cares besides progs that got their fee, fees hurt.  He went through his chain of command because he went to the Speaker of the house first. H3ll he went to the press before he went to the President and then to the ranking member. 


Republicans do not answer to Democrats like you seem to want us to believe.

PaulinNH
PaulinNH

@td1234 @StraightNoChaser  Reading things that aren't written again, are we?  You need to get some nourishment in you - your trolling is pretty pathetic today.

StraightNoChaser
StraightNoChaser

@td1234 @StraightNoChaser The speaker of the house is not chain of command on the intel committee which meets in secret in the basement of the House.  Stop making yourself look more ridiculous than you already have. 

td1234
td1234

@StraightNoChaser Really? Who appoints the Chairman to the committee? Who receives more top secret briefings than the chairman. 


You just cannot get over your butthurt enough to actually see straight. 

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@td1234 @StraightNoChaser "The POTUS does not work for the country?"


Ok, let me know what Trump has done for the Country, and not for himself. 

You know, to protect and defend the constitution instead of attacking it. 


I'm very curious to know!

ByteMe
ByteMe

@TBS I think that "or I'm done" should be "and I'm done"

Donnie_Pinko
Donnie_Pinko

So, about this Keystone pipeline signing today.......

Do you think maybe there's a connection between that and today's healthcare vote? 

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@Donnie_Pinko No. 


Keystone is about jobs. 

Jobs to build. 

Jobs to maintain. 

Jobs to keep cleaning up all the spills. 

Jobs to take care of the sick as a result of the spills. 


Good for everybody! amirite!?!?

TBS
TBS

@Donnie_Pinko


I mentioned that below.  Regardless of the outcome of the vote the administration imo wanted a guaranteed "win" this week to serve as a distraction for their suppporters.   


Donnie_Pinko
Donnie_Pinko

@PaulinNH @Donnie_Pinko 

All that I've heard about Tillerson in recent days is the press's hyperventilation over the apparently skipped NATO meeting.

PaulinNH
PaulinNH

@Donnie_Pinko @PaulinNH  The UK broadsheets have been writing that Tillerson is basically #4 in the foreign policy pecking order after Trump, Bannon and Kushner and has all the authority of a janitor

Buschleaguer
Buschleaguer

@PaulinNH @Donnie_Pinko Don't most cabinet secretaries take orders from the President and his chief of staff in policy matters.Or maybe it was different under President Obama.

ByteMe
ByteMe

@PaulinNH  I thought it was "US beats ISIS in the third round."

PaulinNH
PaulinNH

@Donnie_Pinko  Who knows. 

BTW - notice what has received minimal press in the last few days?  Tillerson's big anti-ISIS meeting.  It looks like Trump's Big Anti-ISIS strategy looks a whole LOT like Obama's