Opinion: Is Trump a ‘white supremacist?’ Well …

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Earlier this week, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders stood at the podium at the White House briefing room, with the White House logo behind her, and pressed for the firing of an ESPN host who had dared to criticize President Trump on Twitter.

That’s pretty extraordinary.  I can’t think of another president or administration ever using the power of the presidential pulpit to demand the firing of a citizen who had dared to criticize that president. The closest probably example comes from, well, Trump himself. Earlier this year, he bragged that he was personally responsible for ensuring that NFL owners continue to blackball quarterback Colin Kaepernick, chortling that “they don’t want to get a nasty tweet from Donald Trump.”

Presumably, that would be a tweet like this, from Friday morning:

Jemele Hill, the ESPN host in question, had tweeted last week that she considered Trump a white supremacist who had surrounded himself with other white supremacists, and that his presence in the White House was proof of white privilege.

“That is one of the more outrageous comments that anyone could make,” Sanders said in condemning it. “It is certainly something that I think would be a fireable offense by ESPN.”

Let’s get real, because it is not at all difficult to recall comments more outrageous than Hill’s. Accusing Ted Cruz’s father of helping to kill JFK would easily pass that test. Publicly attacking the parents of a heroic U.S. soldier killed in combat would be another, as would a description of Megyn Kelly as “bleeding out of her … wherever.”

And then there’s this:

Now, let’s set that aside and focus on the content and accuracy of Hill’s comments.

Her allegation that Trump is the epitome of white privilege is undoubtedly true. There is no known universe in which a black man burdened with Trump’s 40-year record of sexual licentiousness, serial marital infidelity and bizarre public statements could plausibly be considered for the presidency, let alone win. Likewise, if the Obama administration had ever called for the firing of a white conservative critic, the howls of outrage would have been deafening. So the existence of a double standard is not a subject open to real debate.

The charge that Trump is a white supremacist is more difficult, although he keeps trying to make it easier. On Thursday, when he once again revisited the topic of violence at Charlottesville, he twice condemned the actions of antifa without ever condemning the neo-Nazis and white supremacists who by most accounts had provoked the violence. You add that to a long list of things, including his statements about Mexicans and Muslims, and you do begin to wonder.

That said, I still don’t think we have sufficient evidence to justify a charge that Trump is himself a white supremacist.  We do have the evidence to state that Trump is the agent of white resentment and anxiety. He provokes that resentment, he gives voice to it, legitimizes it and benefits from it.

He’s Al Sharpton for white people.

The question that confounds me is why so many white people feel the need for their own Sharpton, given the architecture of American society. Just four of the Fortune 500 CEOs (0.8 percent) are black. The median wealth of white households in this country is more than 10 times that of black households. Black and Latino Americans comprise 30 percent of the population but hold 7 percent of its wealth. According to a study published by the St. Louis Federal Reserve, “the typical white family whose head is unemployed has nearly twice the wealth as the typical black family whose head is employed fulltime.” And while 70 percent of NFL players are black, 0 percent of NFL owners are black. It is white market power and white NFL management that dictates that Kaepernick can’t get a job in the league.

The counter usually offered to such facts is the existence of affirmative action programs, particularly in colleges and universities. But that opens the door to another interesting debate. Almost a third of the incoming freshman class at Harvard, for example, have parents, grandparents or other close relatives who also attended Harvard. Having a parent who attended that school triples your chances of getting admitted, putting everybody else at a serious disadvantage.

That isn’t a meritocracy. That is the existing and almost exclusively white power structure perpetuating itself while diminishing the hopes of better qualified, but less well-connected strivers. And Harvard is far from alone. A study of admissions at the top 30 universities in the country found that being a “legacy” increased your chances of admission by 45 percent.

Then there’s the Jared Kushner route. When his high school academic record fell short of the standards for getting into Harvard, his dad wrote the school a check for $2 million and voila! — Jared got his acceptance letter. If young Jared had been black and had gotten that acceptance through affirmative action, he would be accused of unfairly taking that spot from somebody who deserved it more. Getting in because his rich daddy stroked a check also meant that somebody better qualified was denied admission, but we tend to shrug that off as just the way the world works. I think that difference tells us a lot.

So everywhere you look — in corporate board rooms, in Congress and other governmental bodies, in the economic statistics — you see overwhelming evidence that this remains a white-dominated country. And if some white Americans have a hard time believing that, based on their own personal outlook, I’m pretty sure minority America sees the situation more clearly.

In that kind of society, with that kind of continued economic and political dominance, being Al Sharpton for white people takes on a whole different flavor. Among other things, we’ve learned that being Al Sharpton for white people can make you president. Trump is not the voice of a minority struggling for its share of the pie, he is the angry, resentful voice of the majority that controls the pie.  And from the point of view of minority America, it’s not hard to imagine that being experienced as white supremacy.

Reader Comments 0

4467 comments
Carl Hart
Carl Hart

If he's not ...he act like he is

Dwight Kirkpatrick
Dwight Kirkpatrick

Nonsense, you democrats are all drinking the same Jim jones kool aid!

Carl Hart
Carl Hart

What about the 5 black kids in N.Y.

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

Doesn't police training include any kind of non-lethal solution to those who do not obey police orders right away? 


Or are they trained to just shoot when someone might be deaf, might be mentally slow, might be on some drugs that make them mentally slow? 


Because there seems to be a call for non-lethal solutions in these situations, but police seem quite slow on the uptake here. 

Surelyyoujest
Surelyyoujest

@LogicalDude  You never know how you will respond, despite all your training, until you are in that position and then survival mode takes over...

Fan4500
Fan4500

@LogicalDude Read below, someone stated GT police don't carry tasers or mace.

P.S. And if my child was attending a University, and some person was not obeying commands and walking around campus with something perceived dangerous, I would want the police to respond like they did.

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@Surelyyoujest @LogicalDude "despite all your training, until you are in that position and then survival mode takes over..."


The training is supposed to replace that survival mode.   Too many needless deaths result from cops thinking they need to be in "survival mode" when they really just lack the training to replace it. 

Starik
Starik

@LogicalDude @Surelyyoujest  Are the police trained to deal with the mentally ill? Not often.  Do the police deal with stress well? Not always. Too many of these shootings are because of panicky cops. 

YouLibs
YouLibs

Sheets that promise to make Philo a very happy man!

gotalife
gotalife

We are at the 2 minute warning of the second half.


trump's time is running out.

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@Surelyyoujest @LogicalDude @PaulinNH Because he went to the Russians for TRUMP. 


Hey, if he went to the Russians for the good of the country, then hey, that's a different story than what we've heard so far. 

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@Surelyyoujest @LogicalDude @PaulinNH "You know for sure Trump asked him to go and that Trump paid his way? "


That has not been proven.  But Flynn (as part of Trump's campaign) would not have gone to the Russians except for Trump.  If he was not part of the Trump campaign, do you think there would even have been a meeting? 

justaniceguy
justaniceguy

I'd love to stick around and continue to pwn the trolls... but work beckons.

Surelyyoujest
Surelyyoujest

Y'all do know the student killed at GT was white, right? 

Surelyyoujest
Surelyyoujest

@LogicalDude @Surelyyoujest  Not really - we only hear about the times a perp is killed, not the millions of other times the perps respond appropriately and obey the police commands and go to jail or are released quietly.

Starik
Starik

@Surelyyoujest @LogicalDude  Untrained cops assume a "perp" is on drugs when they act crazy. Frequently they are crazy, and their mental problems suddenly appeared, or became acute. 

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

See. This is a great difficulty with trying to have a good conversation with some of the posters here. 


They make a statement (which should be rather easy to defend) and when asked to clarify, give examples, or in any other way defend their statement. . . nothing. 


I though there was a good conversation going about regulations. Evidently, some think there are too many "regulations" which I and others indicated "common sense regulations" make sense.  Others seem to think some regulations do not make sense.  When asked for examples?


Well, I would think that if YOU make the claim about "some regulations do not make sense." YOU CAN AT LEAST come up with an example. 


It's rather telling that some people unthinkingly spout something their party tells them (Like "too many regulations!") but they cannot even look into what regulations their party tells them are "not common sense regulations." 


So, there are too many here that UNTHINKINGLY SPOUT something their party tells them. 

KUTGF
KUTGF

@LogicalDude  Often true about a number of subjects.  Posters should be informed and if ignorant then stop and learn.  Too many of them lock into whatever comes to mind, lacking real evidence. And then they want to chest thump.

InTheMiddle2
InTheMiddle2

@LogicalDude First, I am in and out a lot and do not always respond right away. Second, I don't see why I should considering the vehemence of the group think that opposes anything I say. IT would be a great conversation, but most here could not handle it. To start (just as a general statement) regulations should have at the least a quantifiable benefit.

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@InTheMiddle2 @LogicalDude "To start (just as a general statement) regulations should have at the least a quantifiable benefit."


Let me know any regulations think do not meet this threshold. 


"most here could not handle it"


How about answering a question rationally before ranting about the commenters who may not handle it?  If others show they cannot handle it, then that's on them.  Your own deflections are on you. 

gotalife
gotalife

And then they came for crazy white people......


Watch out fanboy.



Fan4500
Fan4500

I'm not going to second guess the Ga.Tech police. Watch the video, the student was told more than once to drop what he had in his hands. Period.


LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@Fan4500 So, if the student was deaf? 

If the student was a foreign student with limited English skills? 


Everyone should certainly second-guess the cops when they kill someone. 

ALWAYS. 

Fan4500
Fan4500

@LogicalDude @Fan4500 No, he was following some instructions but not others. He was told multiple times, (11+) to drop the knife, he was asked his name, there was some responses that I couldn't make out.

If someone is pointing a gun at me, regardless of what country I'm in, I will drop everything and show them my hands are clear.

LogicalDude
LogicalDude

@Fan4500 @LogicalDude Did he make any threatening move against anyone before he was shot? 


Or was he shot just for not obeying a police officer right away? 

Surelyyoujest
Surelyyoujest

@LogicalDude @Fan4500  It sounds as though he was shot for not following commands of the police while seemingly threatening the police with whatever was in his hand.

Fan4500
Fan4500

@LogicalDude @Fan4500 Don't know, video is obscured some.

"Right away"?? 

They didn't shoot him after 1 verbal command. We only see a one and half minute video, he was giving plenty of commands and he clearly saw the police was pointing guns at him and yet he kept advancing. He was either high, maybe a medical issue or wanted death-by-cop.

gotalife
gotalife

Drain the swamp.


That one still cracks me up.


Biggest lie of the decade.

Fan4500
Fan4500

@gotalife Still the 1st quarter. Don't be impatient.

Wait til the 4th quarter.